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Jeremy Cherfas

Well, there's a surprise.

Worries about food waste appear to vanish when diners know scraps go to compost

​Efforts to educate diners, repurpose leftovers cancel each other out, study finds

Jeremy Cherfas

Ancient Underwater Potato Garden Uncovered in Canada

How hard would it have been to call them

Jeremy Cherfas

My Christmas gift to you: Good sense and very little swearing from @one_angry_chef http://angry-chef.com/blog/the-milk-of-human-foolishness-part-1/

For many people there is a need to see our world as broken and obesity is a highly visible expression of that desire.

But that's really incidental to the main thrust of the piece, a throat clearer, no more. What this really is about is the marvellous medical advances of the past few decades which, double-edged sword, have given so many more of us time to contract illnesses that medicine is still struggling with. Struggling, and winning. Winning slowly.

Jeremy Cherfas

Poor Richard: Philip Guston’s Nixon Drawings Transcend Their Subject

How strange to think of these, as the Review says, post Watergate, post 9/11 and now, post-truth.

Jeremy Cherfas

Jeremy Cherfas

So that's what all those reams of #hashtags are about.

Fun Bloomberg story by a guy who plunged into becoming an Instagram influencer.

Jeremy Cherfas

Google, democracy and the truth about internet search | Technology | The Guardian

This is just plain bad. Very, very bad.

Why does Google even feel the need to complete my question?

There's something to be said for the fact that an anonymous search on Google for "is google" gives Is Google Making Us Stupid? - The Atlantic as its top result.

Jeremy Cherfas

The revolution will not be embargoed: My embargo manifesto, on Vox

"In reality, embargoes allow journals, universities, nonprofits, and corporations to decide what’s important — and when. That should be up to journalists and, frankly, anyone who writes about science. Reporters, even with the best intentions, end up on the study-of-the-week treadmill, and they’re less creative because of the limitations of something called the Ingelfinger Rule, which scares researchers out of talking to them (more on that in a moment). Science, rather than appearing like a human enterprise, full of fits and starts in the never-ending search for knowledge, is expected to prove claims once a week, or even more frequently. And I think that’s bad for readers and viewers."

Jeremy Cherfas

Jeremy Cherfas